Difference between revisions of "AMS Student Chapter Seminar"

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The AMS Student Chapter Seminar is an informal, graduate student seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.
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The AMS Student Chapter Seminar (aka Donut Seminar) is an informal, graduate student seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. The goal of the seminar is to promote community building and give graduate students an opportunity to communicate fun, accessible math to their peers in a stress-free (but not sugar-free) environment. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.
  
* '''When:''' Wednesdays, 3:20 PM – 3:50 PM
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* '''When:''' Wednesdays, 3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
 
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
 
* '''Where:''' Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
* '''Organizers:''' [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~malexis/ Michel Alexis], [https://www.math.wisc.edu/~drwagner/ David Wagner], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~nicodemus/ Patrick Nicodemus], [http://www.math.wisc.edu/~thaison/ Son Tu], Carrie Chen
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* '''Organizers:''' [https://people.math.wisc.edu/~ywu495/ Yandi Wu], Maya Banks
  
Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 30 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.
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Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 25 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.
  
 
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[AMS Student Chapter Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
 
The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found [[AMS Student Chapter Seminar, previous semesters|here]].
  
== Fall 2019 ==
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== Fall 2021 ==
  
=== October 9, Brandon Boggess===
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=== September 29, John Cobb ===
  
Title: TBD
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Title: Rooms on a Sphere
  
Abstract: TBD
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Abstract: A classic combinatorial lemma becomes very simple to state and prove when on the surface of a sphere, leading to easy constructive proofs of some other well known theorems.
  
=== October 16, Jiaxin Jin===
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=== October 6, Karan Srivastava ===
  
Title: TBD
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Title: An 'almost impossible' puzzle and group theory
  
Abstract: TBD
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Abstract: You're given a chessboard with a randomly oriented coin on every square and a key hidden under one of them; player one knows where the key is and flips a single coin; player 2, using only the information of the new coin arrangement must determine where the key is. Is there a winning strategy? In this talk, we will explore this classic puzzle in a more generalized context, with n squares and d sided dice on every square. We'll see when the game is solvable and in doing so, see how the answer relies on group theory and the existence of certain groups.
  
=== October 23, Erika Pirnes===
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=== October 13, John Yin ===
  
Title: Number string sequences
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Title: TBA
  
Abstract: Starting with some string of digits 0-9, add the adjacent numbers pairwise to obtain a new string. Whenever the sum is 10 or greater, separate its digits. For example, 26621 would become 81283 and then 931011. Repeating this process with different inputs gives varying behavior. In some cases the process terminates (becomes a single digit), or ends up in a loop, like 999, 1818, 999... The length of the strings can also start growing very fast. I'll discuss some data and conjectures about classifying the behavior.
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Abstract: TBA
  
=== October 30, Yunbai Cao===
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=== October 20, Varun Gudibanda ===
  
Title: TBD
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Title: TBA
  
Abstract: TBD
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Abstract: TBA
  
=== November 6, Tung Nguyen===
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=== October 27, Andrew Krenz ===
  
Title: TBD
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Title: The 3-sphere via the Hopf fibration
  
Abstract: TBD
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Abstract: The Hopf fibration is a map from $S^3$ to $S^2$.  The preimage (or fiber) of every point under this map is a copy of $S^1$.  In this talk I will explain exactly how these circles “fit together” inside the 3-sphere.  Along the way we’ll discover some other interesting facts in some hands-on demonstrations using paper and scissors.  If there is time I hope to also relate our new understanding of $S^3$ to some other familiar models.
  
=== November 13, Stephen Davis===
 
  
Title: TBD
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=== November 3, TBA ===
  
Abstract: TBD
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Title: TBA
  
=== November 20, Yuxi Han===
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Abstract: TBA
  
Title: TBD
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=== November 10, TBA ===
  
Abstract: TBD
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Title: TBA
  
=== December 4, Xiaocheng Li===
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Abstract: TBA
  
Title: TBD
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=== November 17, TBA ===
  
Abstract: TBD
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Title: TBA
  
=== December 11, TBD===
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Abstract: TBA
  
Title: TBD
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=== November 24, TBA ===
  
Abstract: TBD
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Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA
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=== December 1, TBA ===
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 +
Title: TBA
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 +
Abstract: TBA
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=== December 8, TBA ===
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 +
Title: TBA
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Abstract: TBA

Latest revision as of 15:39, 1 October 2021

The AMS Student Chapter Seminar (aka Donut Seminar) is an informal, graduate student seminar on a wide range of mathematical topics. The goal of the seminar is to promote community building and give graduate students an opportunity to communicate fun, accessible math to their peers in a stress-free (but not sugar-free) environment. Pastries (usually donuts) will be provided.

  • When: Wednesdays, 3:30 PM – 4:00 PM
  • Where: Van Vleck, 9th floor lounge (unless otherwise announced)
  • Organizers: Yandi Wu, Maya Banks

Everyone is welcome to give a talk. To sign up, please contact one of the organizers with a title and abstract. Talks are 25 minutes long and should avoid assuming significant mathematical background beyond first-year graduate courses.

The schedule of talks from past semesters can be found here.

Fall 2021

September 29, John Cobb

Title: Rooms on a Sphere

Abstract: A classic combinatorial lemma becomes very simple to state and prove when on the surface of a sphere, leading to easy constructive proofs of some other well known theorems.

October 6, Karan Srivastava

Title: An 'almost impossible' puzzle and group theory

Abstract: You're given a chessboard with a randomly oriented coin on every square and a key hidden under one of them; player one knows where the key is and flips a single coin; player 2, using only the information of the new coin arrangement must determine where the key is. Is there a winning strategy? In this talk, we will explore this classic puzzle in a more generalized context, with n squares and d sided dice on every square. We'll see when the game is solvable and in doing so, see how the answer relies on group theory and the existence of certain groups.

October 13, John Yin

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

October 20, Varun Gudibanda

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

October 27, Andrew Krenz

Title: The 3-sphere via the Hopf fibration

Abstract: The Hopf fibration is a map from $S^3$ to $S^2$. The preimage (or fiber) of every point under this map is a copy of $S^1$. In this talk I will explain exactly how these circles “fit together” inside the 3-sphere. Along the way we’ll discover some other interesting facts in some hands-on demonstrations using paper and scissors. If there is time I hope to also relate our new understanding of $S^3$ to some other familiar models.


November 3, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

November 10, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

November 17, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

November 24, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

December 1, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA

December 8, TBA

Title: TBA

Abstract: TBA